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Electrical switching contact for signalling the operational readiness of INDEC VD 100 vacuum inspection device

With our INDEC series vacuum inspection systems, food manufacturers have the certainty that the HACCP principles (Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points) are fulfilled.

In the past, we have been asked several times by our customers whether INDEC VD 100 inspection system can provide a signal to the higher-level machine control which signals that the measuring system is ready for operation. This electrical switching contact for signalling the switch-on state of INDEC VD 100 system is now also available as a retrofit option for already supplied INDEC systems.

After pressing the main switch on the front panel, the INDEC VD 100 vacuum device is switched on. A visual check of the device by the user ensures that the vacuum tester is ready for operation, the relevant recipe has been loaded and all distances for the sensor head and the light barrier have been set correctly. The readiness for operation of the INDEC VD 100 is signalled to the higher-level machine control system by an electrical switching contact.

An additional optical coupler, which is mounted on the terminal strip as shown below, is used to exclude any interference between the machine controls.

Once the connection has been made according to the updated connection diagram, this ready signal is then permanently available in the customer's higher-level machine control. The filling line is only started after an internal, positive acknowledgement in the control system. This link ensures that all bottles and jars produced are subjected to a closure check.

The series fault switch contact at INDEC VD 100 vacuum inspection system to stop the entire filling line

With our INDEC range of vacuum testing systems, food manufacturers can be sure that HACCP (Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points) principles are being met. KoCoS vacuum inspection systems are characterised by their superior detection sensitivity and automatic separation of defective products.

Sometimes the lid feed in the capping machine is interrupted. As a result, all containers leave the capping machine without lids. This is particularly annoying because often all uncapped jars have to be disposed of with costs.

Increasingly, our customers who use an INDEC 100 vacuum testing system for cap inspection in production want to stop the filling process immediately if this error, also known as a serial error, occurs. This serial fault switch contact is now also available as a retrofit option for already delivered INDEC VD 100 vacuum testers that have already been delivered.

Once the connection has been made in accordance with wiring diagram, that stop signal is then permanently available in the customer's higher-level machine control system.

This retrofitting of the series fault switch contact on the INDEC VD 100 enables the customer to intervene immediately in the filling process and minimize the scrap of defective containers.

The external signal outputs in vacuum inspection device INDEC 300 for recording counter figures in the customer's data network

With our INDEC range of vacuum testing systems, food manufacturers can be sure that HACCP (Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points) principles are met. KoCoS vacuum inspection systems are characterized by their superior detection sensitivity and automatic separation of defective products.

Increasingly, our customers who use an INDEC 300 vacuum inspection system for closure inspection in production want to feed the data obtained into their data acquisition system or into the higher-level machine control system. INDEC 300 offers a variety of linking possibilities for this purpose.

Often you want to transfer the counter figures for the GOOD, BAD and TOTAL products into the company's own data network for extensive evaluations for quality control. The INDEC 300 is ideally equipped for this. All three counter figures can be determined
simultaneously by setting the pulse duration between 1...120 ms of the respective counter pulses once by the respective global parameters and switching the respective outputs from OFF to ON.

Once the connection has been made according to the connection diagram - marked yellow here - these pulses are then permanently available in the higher-level machine control and the customer's data network.

 

Analogue to the kwon standard screen of INDEC 300 device, those counter numbers can now be used in real time in the customer's data network for a variety of evaluations and analyses.    

This makes it possible, for example, for quality control personnel to take action remotely in the filling process at any time and consistently reduce the reject rate.

The processor-controlled inspection systems of the INDEC 300 series are characterized by the highest reliability and simplest handling and are the first choice for many food manufacturers.

Recently, customers have repeatedly asked us about a suitable large display unit for INDEC systems. They would like to be informed about the current degree of processing for the current batch as well as about error messages on a large-format display, which is visible from afar in the production hall. We are pleased to announce the availability of such a large display with an edge length of 63 x 14 cm for INDEC 300 model.

As you can see in the photos below, the counter number as well as the error messages are easily readable from a great distance. This makes it possible for the operating personnel to quickly take the necessary precautions to immediately eliminate the deficiencies in the filling process.

https://cloud.kocos.com/index.php/s/rG6n38xkPzwo7CA

As a rule, the vacuum testing system is not constantly monitored by the operating personnel. If, during the 100 % inspection of all containers, a system error of the filling line or an equipment malfunction of the INDEC system should occur, this shop floor result display immediately informs the system operator.  

Gerald Herrmann
product manager

Thanks to the excellent, semi-automatic self-learning procedure for determining the sensor parameters (recipes) of the INDEC vacuum inspection systems, commissioning is possible without a KoCoS technician.

Ensuring the highest product quality is a primary and indispensable objective, especially in food production. The tightness of the product containers are an important role in this.

Leaks can cause the contents to leak out. But it is much more important that germs penetrate the container and spoil the product.

The INDEC vacuum testing systems monitor the tightness of containers fully automatically directly in the production process. A wide variety of containers such as bottles, jars and cans are checked for leaks without contact and defective containers are removed from the product flow.

Often, the necessary technician charges for commissioning, especially in Europe or overseas, are not in good proportion to the purchase price of an INDEC system. Sometimes these costs amount to another 30-40% of the purchase price for the equipment.

For this reason, it is very important to have good and meaningful documents such as the operating instructions and suitable videos. We have all those resources in good quality with the INDEC vacuum inspection system.

To make the start easier for the customer, we offer to send us some bottles and jars from his range. We already save predefined sensor parameter sets (recipes) in his ordered INDEC device ex works. If fine-tuning is still required, this can be completed between the end customer and us using modern communication media.

This has already been proven several times in the past, both in Germany with the company STANGL, in the EU with the French company ANDRESY and overseas with PRINCES TUNA in Mauritius. These screen shots illustrate the self-learning process.

The system automatically adjusts the threshold to distinguish between good and bad containers. The more containers are fed to the tester, the more representative the result is for a good separation of good and bad containers.

Due to the excellent, semi-automatic self-learning procedure for determining the sensor parameters (recipes) of the INDEC vacuum testing systems, it is possible for the customer to commission the system on his own. The use of a KoCoS technician or a technician from our local representative on site is not mandatory.

Reliable operation of all INDEC vacuum inspection systems under the most difficult operating conditions such as vibrations of the conveyor belt.

The vacuum inspection systems of the INDEC series offer our customers a reliable solution for leak testing of jars, bottles and metal cans even under extreme operating conditions. The inspection takes place contact-free as a 100% in-line inspection directly in the production process. An optical sensor detects the vacuum-induced deformation of the lids. Even non-metallic container closures can be inspected. Containers with insufficient vacuum, crooked or missing lids are reliably detected and can be separated fully automatically from the product flow with an ejector. All components are made of stainless steel (1.4404), are resistant to cleaning agents and disinfectants and meet the requirements of protection class IP69K.

How do vibrations of the conveyor affect the reliability of INDEC systems?
We are often confronted by our customers with the question of whether the INDEC systems still function reliably when the conveyor belt is vibrating. This question can be answered with an unequivocal yes.
For this purpose, we would like to refer again to the measuring procedure and the mode of operation of all INDEC systems. The test procedure is based on the determination of the vacuum-induced deformation of the passing container closures. The tightness of the containers is assessed by comparison with a previously “Golden” sample. If a container to be inspected interrupts the light barrier under the sensor head, an infrared light beam is emitted by the sensor head and reflected by the lid of the container.  A sophisticated algorithm calculates the concave shape (yellow curve between the two red arrows, see the figure below measuring principle) of the deformed lid caused by the vacuum in the head space. Depending on the given boundary conditions, vacuum tests are possible from
50 µm deformation or from 150 mbar differential pressure in the headspace to the external pressure.

To illustrate the correct operation of the INDEC models even when the conveyor belt is vibrating, see the following video. From 0:34...0:50 min, artificial vibrations are triggered on the sensor head - analogous to vibrations of the conveyor belt - the INDEC system continues to work correctly in that only when passing the opened bottle marked with the white tape does the signal lamp briefly light up for a container without vacuum.  

Link: cloud.kocos.com/index.php/s/9gkyCKcps5g3rpk

Avoid product recalls even before the goods leave production - with reliable vacuum inspection systems from KoCoS.

Reduction of product recalls and costly image damage through the new product feature ejector monitoring at INDEC 300 systems

Avoid product recalls even before the goods leave production - with the reliable vacuum inspection systems from KoCoS.

With our INDEC range of vacuum inspection systems, food manufacturers have the assurance that HACCP (Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points) principles are met.
KoCoS vacuum inspection systems are characterised by their superior detection sensitivity and automatic rejection of defective products in the food industry.

The ejector monitoring function checks whether the ejector has separated a container from the product flow that has been detected as bad. For this purpose, another light barrier is arranged parallel to the conveyor belt opposite the ejector. If the light barrier is not interrupted by the bad container within the adjustable delay after the ejector has been triggered, an error message is generated.

Call up the Edit Ejector screen - tap the Monitoring button, set it to ON and enter the manually determined delay. In addition to the error message, an electrical switching signal can be output via a binary output, for example to stop the production process automatically.

The costs incurred by executed recalls, such as publication of warning messages, transport back to the factory and loss of sales, are relatively easy to calculate. But the more far-reaching consequences of the action, such as the loss of brand image among supermarkets and consumers, are not so easy to foresee.

It is precisely under these conditions that smaller manufacturing companies focus on vacuum testing systems from the INDEC series to minimise the risk of product recalls. It is also a way of signalling to the authorities and their trade customers that they meet the required standards and are available for lucrative new markets.

In food manufacturing, a good reputation is particularly important. The less often improperly sealed bottles and jars reach the consumer, the better. Only in this way can manufacturers protect the image of their brand, increase sales and secure their profits.

More and more small and medium-sized enterprises are realising that the best way to achieve these goals is with an INDEC series vacuum inspection system from KoCoS.

When you integrate an INDEC vacuum inspection system into your process, you can be confident that you are meeting current HACCP requirements and that your reputation and customers are reliably protected.